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CDC-Vaccine-and-Autism
It is shocking that so many children are suffering because this story and hundreds more like it have been pushed away from public view.  However, as more lives are sacrificed these stories are sadly becoming more commonplace and accessible.

Nicco LaHood is a criminal district attorney in San Antonio, Texas and he and his wife share their story.  Very worth watching.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pi9PNKW7w3Q&feature=youtu.be

Yours for Better Health, Dr. Shapero

EXPECT MIRACLES – WE DO
www.premierhealthcaresc.com

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gradStressCongratulations on a achieving your goal.  You made it!  Now what?  That is the question that has caused much anxiety for many graduates.

In fact the stress is so common there is even a label for it.  However, this is NOT a condition that needs medication.  Post Graduation Stress Disorder is when the high of graduation decreases and the reality of what’s next is faced square on.

This type of stress can lead to some very bad habits and can also lead to premature death.

Most graduates are so excited about graduation and have poured hours and days into their studies to pass examinations and get ready for the big day.  However, few have taken time to properly prepare for the next step which is how to use this new knowledge which has been worked so hard to get.

This type of stress bears the following symptoms:

  • Feeling you are not in control of your life
  • Feeling a lack of support after commencement
  • Feelings of failure if the new graduate is unable to find work in their area of specialty in a reasonable length of time
  • Sleeplessness and irritability
  • Avoidance of normal, everyday activities* – *Please also be aware that these symptoms might not present themselves until some weeks or months after the commencement.

There are some very straight forward steps one can take to reduce the stress and take control of the situation.

First sit down and make a plan.  It is good to talk with someone who has been through this already perhaps in the same industry.  Map out your first couple of weeks.  Then the first few months, six months and one year.  Organize this into clear actions steps and prioritize these so that you have a step by step program.  Now get busy on the plan.  Use the same enthusiasm for this plan as you did for graduation.

What is YOUR Purpose.  Have a clear picture of where you want to go and know that it will take work and persistence to get there.  As long as you keep your vision on the goal you will get there.  Be flexible in your plan so that you can make the appropriate changes as you progress.  Just like sailing a ship you must navigate changing waters.   Also, have a clear idea of WHY you are doing what you are doing.  What is the driving force that keeps you excited and will continue to push you through the troubled times?  Write it down and look at it often.

Put a winning team together.  We rarely function alone.  As you put your plan together take a look at those you know or those you will want to get to know that can help you on your journey.  What is YOUR all star team.  Who do you want those players to be.  This may include coaches, friends, colleagues or other entrepreneurs, doctors, trades people, accountants, attorneys etc.

Keep in mind YOU have what it takes right now to take the next step.  If you keep taking that next step you will be less stressed but most of all  you WILL be successful.  Here is to YOUR next step.  If you are a graduate reading this Congratulations to you.

If you know someone that you feel would benefit from some personal coaching or needs guidance with a health related problem or to manage stress Dr. Shapero can help.

Yours for Better Health, Dr. Shapero

EXPECT MIRACLES – WE DO
www.premierhealthcaresc.com

mothers-day1
Often we find that some of the experiences we go through in life are more fully appreciated years later when we can look back with greater perspective.  It would be a rare child that would have the depth of gratitude for all that one’s mother does for her children.  The sacrifices, the difficulties and the challenges in helping her child or children have a better life.  We often do not realize some of the little things our mother does for us that has helped us be a better person, enjoy life in a more meaningful way and Mother’s Day gives us that moment to pause and reflect.

Happy Mother’s Day with appreciation for all the mom’s out there in the world without which we would have no world.  I am grateful for my mother and the many lessons learned from her on how to be a better person.

As a child perhaps you have had the thought of tying up your mother?  Sound strange, I agree?  In Yugoslavia children do just that and only release the mom after she has given them treats.

In most of the cultures and languages the term Mother starts with an “M”.

Mother’s Day sees around one quarter of all flowers purchased throughout the year falling on this holiday.

In the United States alone, around 122 million phone calls are made to moms on Mother’s Day.  Did you call your mother for mother’s day?

In 1939 in Lima, Peru, the youngest mother on record delivered a baby boy by C-section. She was only 5 years-old and the baby was raised as her brother.

On the flip-side, the oldest woman to deliver a baby was recorded on April 9, 2003. Her name is, Satyabhama Mahapatra, and is a 65-year-old retired schoolteacher in India. She gave birth to a baby boy, which was her first child after 50 years of marriage. However, the eggs were donated by her 26 year-old niece.

Elizabeth Ann Buttle gives a whole new meaning to second family. She gave birth to her first child (a girl) May 19,1956. Then when she was 60 years-old, she gave birth to her son on November 20, 1997, making the babies 41 years 185 days apart.

Whether you take a moment to reflect on your Mother’s memories perhaps with a white carnation in her honor or you are fortunate and are able to speak to or spend time with your mother on this special day may this Mother’s Day be uplifting and heartwarming.

Thanks Mom for just being YOU!

Yours for Better Health, Dr. Shapero
EXPECT MIRACLES – WE DO
www.premierhealthcaresc.com

 

Hangry is a Real Thing

hangry-cat

When the body is deprived of blood glucose (which tends to happen when meals are skipped) the brain receives all kinds of signals to behave aggressively. Snapping out at partner or in some cases strangers happens because aggressive and violent behaviors are restrained by self-control. Self-control consumes a lot of glucose in the brain, suggesting that low glucose and poor glucose metabolism are linked to aggression and violence. A low blood sugar supply to the brain has other negative side effects.

The strain of exercising self-control all day long uses a lot of energy, using a lot of glucose. When there is a lack of food to be broken down there is a shortage of glucose, but there is more to it than that. The body tries to compensate when blood glucose decreases by releasing certain hormones, like cortisol and adrenaline (which can increase aggressiveness).

Fatigue and impaired concentration is also a side effect, which doesn’t necessarily need to have an aggressive response to low blood sugar. If getting “hangry” is a real problem for some people they should stay on top of their hunger pains, and try to eat regularly. Healthy snacks like fruits offer the body lots of easily accessible sugars and have other nutritional benefits.

Source: “The Science Behind Why You Get Hangry.” The Science Behind Why You Get Hangry. Web. 17 Feb. 2016.

Yours for Better Health, Dr. Shapero

EXPECT MIRACLES – WE DO
www.premierhealthcaresc.com

Happy Valentines Day 2016

happy-valentines-day-quotes-love-wishes-always-cute

February 14th is probably the sweetest day of the year—and we’re not only talking about sugary candy hearts and boxes full of chocolate truffles. Valentine’s Day is a time to celebrate all kinds of love and appreciation with friends and family.  Sending Love to that special person who has forever captured MY heart.

There are many people such as our armed forces for example who for one reason or another are unable to be with their one true love.  May you soon be with those you love in health and joy.

Fun History of Valentine’s Day:

  • Alexander Graham Bell applied for his patent on the telephone on February 14th, 1876.
  • Cupid, the little cherub that shoots love arrows on Valentine’s Day, is the son of the Roman god of love and beauty, Venus (whose favorites flower was a red rose).
  • England’s King Henry VIII declared February 14th an official holiday in 1537.
  • In the 1800s, chocolate was considered a cure to calm medical patients’ pining for lost love.
  • To find their Valentine during the Middle Ages, young men and women drew names from a bowl and wore the name on their sleeves for one week, coining the expression “wear your heart on your sleeve.”

Traditions Around the World:

  • The U.S., Canada, Mexico, France, Australia, and the U.K. are the only countries that celebrate Valentine’s Day.
  • In the Italian city of Verona, where Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet takes place, about 1,000 letters arrive every Valentine’s Day addressed to Juliet.

Gifts:

  • Teachers will receive the most Valentine’s Day cards every year. Next comes children, mothers, wives, and significant others.
  • About 1 billion Valentine’s Day cards are exchanged each year. Only Christmas tops that number.
  • About 3 per cent of pet owners will give Valentine’s Day gifts to their pets.
  • Richard Cadbury made the first box of chocolates for Valentine’s Day in the late 1800s.
  • 12.8 million stems of roses, making more than one million bouquets of a dozen, were produced in Canada in 2009.

Some healthy Tips for Lowering Blood Pressure:

Before resorting to medication here are some simple tips for lowering blood pressure.  Lifestyle changes are largest most effective way to lower blood pressure along with helping many other health problems.

1. Lose Weight

Blood pressure often increases as weight increases. Being overweight also can cause disrupted breathing while you sleep (sleep apnea), which further raises your blood pressure.

Weight loss is one of the most effective lifestyle changes for controlling blood pressure. Losing just 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) can help reduce your blood pressure.

Besides shedding pounds, you generally should also keep an eye on your waistline. Carrying too much weight around your waist can put you at greater risk of high blood pressure.

In general:

  • Men are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 40 inches (102 centimeters).
  • Women are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 35 inches (89 centimeters).

These numbers vary among ethnic groups. Ask Dr. Shapero about a healthy waist measurement for you.

2. Exercise Regularly

Regular physical activity — at least 30 minutes most days of the week — can lower your blood pressure by 4 to 9 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). It’s important to be consistent because if you stop exercising, your blood pressure can rise again.

If you have slightly high blood pressure (prehypertension), exercise can help you avoid developing full-blown hypertension. If you already have hypertension, regular physical activity can bring your blood pressure down to safer levels.

The best types of exercise for lowering blood pressure include walking, jogging, cycling, swimming or dancing. Strength training also can help reduce blood pressure. Talk to Dr. Shapero about developing an exercise program.

3. Eat Healthy

Eating a diet that is rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products and skimps on saturated fat and cholesterol can lower your blood pressure by up to 14 mm Hg. If you are not sure of what changes to make or where to start Dr. Shapero can help tailor a plan that is right for you.

4. Reduce Salty Foods

Even a small reduction in the sodium in your diet can reduce blood pressure by 2 to 8 mm Hg.

The effect of sodium intake on blood pressure varies among groups of people. In general, limit sodium to less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) a day or less. However, a lower sodium intake — 1,500 mg a day or less — is appropriate for people with greater salt sensitivity, including:

  • African-Americans
  • Anyone age 51 or older
  • Anyone diagnosed with high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease

To decrease sodium in your diet, consider these tips:

  • Read food labels. If possible, choose low-sodium alternatives of the foods and beverages you normally buy.
  • Eat fewer processed foods. Only a small amount of sodium occurs naturally in foods. Most sodium is added during processing.
  • Don’t add salt. Just 1 level teaspoon of salt has 2,300 mg of sodium. Use herbs or spices to add flavor to your food.
  • Ease into it. If you don’t feel you can drastically reduce the sodium in your diet suddenly, cut back gradually. Your palate will adjust over time.

 5. Alcohol in Moderation

Alcohol can be both good and bad for your health. In small amounts, it can potentially lower your blood pressure by 2 to 4 mm Hg.

But that protective effect is lost if you drink too much alcohol — generally more than one drink a day for women and for men older than age 65, or more than two a day for men age 65 and younger. One drink equals 12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor.

Drinking more than moderate amounts of alcohol can actually raise blood pressure by several points. It can also reduce the effectiveness of blood pressure medications.

 6. Quit Smoking

Each cigarette you smoke increases your blood pressure for many minutes after you finish. Quitting smoking helps your blood pressure return to normal. People who quit smoking, regardless of age, have substantial increases in life expectancy.

7. Cut Back on Caffeine

The role caffeine plays in blood pressure is still debated. Caffeine can raise blood pressure by as much as 10 mm Hg in people who rarely consume it, but there is often little to no strong effect on blood pressure in habitual coffee drinkers.  Which is thought to be due to the taxing effect on the adrenal glands.

Although the effects of chronic caffeine ingestion on blood pressure aren’t clear, the possibility of a slight increase in blood pressure exists.  It also affects other glands adversely.

8. Reduce Your Stress

Chronic stress is an important contributor to high blood pressure. Occasional stress also can contribute to high blood pressure if you react to stress by eating unhealthy food, drinking alcohol or smoking.  This area can be an entire article in itself.  If you have more stress than you feel your can deal with Dr. Shapero can help you with a customized program to help you manage or eliminate stress that is affecting you.

9. Monitor Your Blood Pressure

If blood pressure is a concern for you, home monitoring can help you keep tabs on your blood pressure, make certain your lifestyle changes are working, and alert you and your doctor to potential health complications. Blood pressure monitors are available widely and without a prescription. Talk to your doctor about home monitoring before you get started.

10. Help Is Here for YOU

Not sure where to start or what the next step is for you?  Dr. Shapero is here to help and if you are not sure about taking blood pressure just call our office and Dr. Shapero will reserve a time for you to have it checked for FREE.

Wishing you all a healthy and Joyous Valentine’s Day.

Yours for Better Health, Dr. Shapero

EXPECT MIRACLES – WE DO
www.premierhealthcaresc.com


Good news for chocolate enthusiasts. I have been asked this question about chocolate many times over the past few years.  I decided to post something to close out the holidays.  Dark chocolate has been found to help significantly lower cardiovascular mortality thanks to the high content of polyphenolic flavonoids.

Polyphenols are chemical compounds found in fruits, vegetables, teas, cocoa and other plants that have certain health benefits such as being antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic and other properties. They can also help protect from oxidative stress and some diseases.

Flavonoids are within the polyphenol family but while all flavonoids are polyphenols not all polyphenols are flavonoids. Plants produce flavonoids as protection against parasites, injury and harsh climatic conditions.

Cardiovascular disease can be caused by stress. The study tested healthy non-smoking men between the ages of 20 to 50 and assessed stress reactivity over a 6 week period of regularly consuming either flavonoid-containing tea or flavonoid-free placebo tea. It showed a faster decline in cortisol levels (stress levels) in the active tea group.

The test administrating dark chocolate was more in depth but showed similar results meaning that in certain doses dark chocolate can help assist a healthy lifestyle. Here is how it can affect the body in a positive way.

    Improves blood flow and protects arteries. A 2007 Swiss study of heart transplant patients found that the diameter of their coronary arteries was significantly increased after eating a single dose of dark chocolate. Which means that dark chocolate has a healthy effect on these important arteries that supply life-sustaining oxygen to the heart. A 2007 study by Chinese researchers found that participants who ate approximately 1.5 ounces of dark chocolate daily for two weeks significantly improved coronary blood flow. “Blood flow is vital to heart health because the blood carries oxygen, and oxygen is fuel for cells,” explains Tom Morledge, MD, of the Center for Integrative Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. Consider that the heart pumps 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, and it’s easy to see why an optimum source of energy is important to its function. On the other hand, eating a fast food hamburger with all the trimmings can cause the arteries in our bodies to have impaired function within an hour.

  Prevents blockage of the arteries. LDL, or “lousy,” cholesterol becomes harmful if it is damaged by free radicals, which changes the structure of the LDL, causing it to become oxidized LDL cholesterol. Oxidized LDL cholesterol is then taken up by inflammatory cells that are in the lining of the arteries. The more accumulation, the more likely it is to form blockages that can impede blood flow or clots that can rapidly form, which trigger a heart attack. “Many studies suggest that the flavonoids in dark chocolate decrease the free radical damage of LDL cholesterol,” Dr. Morledge says. In addition, the flavonoids have a similar effect to aspirin. “Flavonoids are a natural blood thinner and affect platelets which can cause clots that lead to heart attacks.” We don’t know yet whether dark chocolate can actually prevent a heart attack, but some recent studies suggest that this might be the case.

  Raises levels of good cholesterol. HDL, or “healthy,” cholesterol works to moderate overall levels of cholesterol, and even small increases in HDL can lead to significant reduction in risk of developing heart disease. “For every 1 milligram improvement in HDL cholesterol, you get a 2 percent reduction in the risk of a heart attack,” Dr. Morledge says. Although studies present conflicting evidence about the full impact dark chocolate on HDL levels, several studies have linked dark chocolate consumption with higher HDL.

How Much Is Healthful?

Most of the research recommends a serving of about 1.5 ounces or less.  Although chocolate devotees won’t be at all surprised to hear it, research has also shown that dark chocolate can enhance mood and promote cognitive function: A 2004 study from British researchers found that participants who ate dark chocolate performed significantly better on visual tests that required quick reaction times and reported a noticeable uptick in their mood and energy levels.

Let’s keep in mind that chocolate still has calories so we do not want to eat so much we add to the caloric load or cause an imbalance by tipping the scales.

Perhaps the best way to add dark chocolate to your diet is as a replacement for other sweets you may be consuming — you’ll likely be eating fewer calories, consuming substantially fewer grams of sugar and sodium, and getting a lot more fiber if you opt for more traditional desserts. Not convinced? Compare the numbers on dark chocolate, carrot cake, a chocolate chip cookie from Starbucks, and a 1.5 ounce of Hershey’s milk chocolate for yourself:

Serving Size Calories Sugar Sodium Fiber
Dark chocolate 1.5 ounces 220 12 grams 5 mgs 5 grams
Milk chocolate 1.5 ounces 210 24 grams 35 mgs 1 gram
Carrot Cake 1/6 cake 300 27 grams 320 mgs 2 grams
Chocolate chip cookie 1 cookie 350 34 grams 300 mgs 3 grams

When you are shopping for a dark chocolate bar, let the cocoa content be your guide — it is typically listed prominently on the label, and you want a bar with at least 70 percent cocoa beans. The higher the percentage, the more antioxidant content. If you really want to prioritize the antioxidant content, consider buying cocoa powder — it has the highest concentrations of flavonoids of any dark chocolate product.

Yours for Better Health, Dr. Shapero

EXPECT MIRACLES – WE DO
www.premierhealthcaresc.com

Source: Perani, Clara, Inga Neumann, Stefan Reber, and David Slattery. “High-fat Diet Prevents Adaptive Peripartum-associated Adrenal Gland Plasticity and Anxiolysis.” Scientific Reports. Nature Publishing Group. Web. 13 Nov. 2015.

Sneezes – Causes and Myths

Over the next few moments I will share with you some myths about sneezing many causes and a few practical solutions.  According to the literature there are over 450 causes of thousands of reasons for sneezing.  However, to simplify it there are only a few basics to explain sneezes or if you want the technical term  “sternutation”.

When we sneeze, air is expelled with force from the nose (and from the mouth, if it is open) due to a spasmodic contraction of the chest muscles and diaphragm. A sneeze is often triggered by irritation of the mucous membrane of the nose or less often by a bright light striking the eye.

According to WebMD  Sneezing helps keep your body safe. “Sneezing is an important part of the immune process, helping to keep us healthy and sniffle-free”

Sneezes protect your body by clearing the nose of bacteria and viruses, as well as numerous other irritants in the air passage way. This can include chemicals from dry cleaning, new furniture or bedding, as well as many other chemical agents.  When something enters your nose or you encounter a trigger that sets off your “sneeze center” in your brain, located in the lower brain stem, signals are rapidly sent to tightly close your throat, eyes, and mouth. Next, your chest muscles vigorously contract, and then your throat muscles quickly relax. As result, air — along with saliva and mucus — is forced out of your mouth and nose. Voila, you’ve sneezed.

What does this have to do with chiropractic you may ask?  “Sneezes start in your nerves,” says Neil Kao, MD, an allergy and asthma specialist at the Allergic Disease and Asthma Center in Greenville, S.C.

Having a well balanced nerve system and one free from irritation can reduce sneezing and boost your immune system.  When the bones in the spine become irritated it can affect your resistance and effectiveness of the immune system.

Other non-allergenic or immune related causes are plucking the eyebrows, attending to hairs in the nasal passage, and even bright light.

Important to note as well sometimes, cures for sneezing from allergies bring on larger ones. Using corticosteroid nasal sprays, for instance, can bring on a bout of sneezing. As well as other allergy medications.  Again, the nose reacts at the introduction of a foreign agent.  You would be better off with a light saline solution to flush the area and then leave it alone.

Amazingly sneezes travel at about 100 miles per hour.  Also worth noting, that usually we do not sneeze in our sleep, so rest easy.  Bless YOU!

Strange sneezing facts aside, there are some beliefs about sneezing that just aren’t true.

For instance, it’s not true that your heart stops when you sneeze. When your chest contracts because of a sneeze, your blood flow is momentarily constricted as well. As a result, the rhythm of your heart may change, but it definitely doesn’t stop.

And your eyeballs cannot pop out of your head when you sneeze. Most people naturally close their eyes when they sneeze, but if they are able to keep them open, their eyes stay firmly planted in their heads where they belong. While it’s true a person’s blood pressure behind the eyes may increase slightly when he sneezes, it’s not enough force to dislodge the eyeballs from the head.

How do you stop a sneeze? While it’s not foolproof, Try breathing through your mouth and pinching the end of your nose.

Just like so many other symptoms sneezes are the result of some underlying irritation on the system.  The underlying cause is what we look for and once that is relieved your body will feel much better.

Yours for Better Health, Dr. Shapero

EXPECT MIRACLES – WE DO
www.premierhealthcaresc.com

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